Rebecca Watson at the CFI Conference: The Conversation that SHOULD Have Happened

In response to the whole Richard Dawkins – Rebecca Watson debacle, below is the conversation that should have taken place.

Women “Rebecca Watson was alone late last night here in Dublin, a foreign country to her. She was on her way back to her hotel room when she got into an elevator. Inside, there was a man also attending the CFI Conference. He asked Rebecca if she would like to go back to his room for coffee. This made her feel uncomfortable given the context of being alone, late at night, in an unfamiliar place.”

Men “Oh dear that must have felt unsettling for her, given the context. I hope she is able to feel safe during her stay here. Men should acknowledge that other people have varying perceptions of a situation to that of their own. These perceptions can be due to insecurities resulting from personal or common experiences of a gender, race or sexual orientation.”

Woman “Thanks men, we really appreciate you having empathy in this situation. The practicality of the matter may seem trivial, as the man in the elevator just asked a question, but our greater feeling of safety is all too relevant.”

Men “You’re welcome. So can we go get that coffee now?’

Woman“Yes, this is a much more appropriate context and you’re very thoughtful. Coffee’s on me.”

Now let’s move on.

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6 thoughts on “Rebecca Watson at the CFI Conference: The Conversation that SHOULD Have Happened

  1. Pingback: Rebecca Watson at the CFI Conference: The Conversation that SHOULD Have Happened | Young Australian Skeptics

  2. Why don’t we accept her as a neurotic and atheistic woman, obviously mislead by a non-sensical ideology called feminism?
    Why don’t we have enough humor to perceive that her surroundings that night were to teach her something, namely: “Girly, you are totally wrong!”

  3. Some Guy: Last night I was in an elevator when a (insert ethnic group here) man followed me in and asked me where I bought my watch. This made me feel uncomfortable given the context of being alone, late at night, in an unfamiliar place.

    Some other guy: Did he hurt you? Threaten you? Take your watch?

    Some Guy: No. He told me it was a nice watch, said have a good night and left.

    Some other guy: And the problem is…?

    Some guy: It was scary…and he COULD have hurt me! Have you seen the crime statistics?

    Some other guy: Please, just shut up.

    Some guy: Why won’t (ethnic group) people accept responsibility for my fear?

    Yes, let’s move on.

  4. I’m with you logically Geoff, but this is an emotional discussion. People don’t want to be told “please, just shut up” they want to be acknowledged. It takes 2 seconds to do this and then we can spend our time discussing more important things.

  5. Wouldn’t it be much more instructive to show them: “That’s
    n o t the right way (!) to beg for acknowledgement. Do something for others and don’t mourn about your selfish feelings! Think about the way how your ancestors were conducting their lifes.”

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